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Beginners PDF Guide to Drupal

As as a veteran of 12 years experience in Software Engineering field, and who wanted a speedy primer on Drupal, this ebook certainly got me started.

This ebook outlines the bigger picture, from which you can dig deep, and all the resources are mentioned in it.
After reading through this beginner guide, you will know what to look for further, as it introduces you to the taxonomy required.

Publishing Concurrent Requests with XML Publisher

XML Publisher enables customers to utilize a set of familiar desktop tools to create and maintain their own report formats based on XML data extracts from their existing Oracle Applications concurrent request programs. At runtime, XML Publisher merges the custom templates with the concurrent request data extracts to generate output in PDF, HTML, RTF, EXCEL (HTML), or even text for use with EFT and EDI transmissions.

Access 2007: Basic Database Development

The Primary Key should be the table name plus “ID” (e.g., MemberID) and should be the same name in the table where it is used as a Foreign Key. (There are exceptions. In this course, the Foreign Keys LoanedToID and MemberID in tblMemberCD table both go back to the Primary Key MemberID in tblMember.) The Primary Key should always be the first field in each table, followed by any foreign key(s). Primary Keys should never be actual data—not even something unique like a Social Security number or Student ID. These values are obtained from an outside source and, while seemingly unique and reliable, could produce data entry errors.

A Quick Microsoft Access 2003 Tutorial

Though Microsoft Access is NOT synonymous with database systems, there are more copies of Microsoft Access in use than any other database system. It therefore behooves computer science students to be at least superficially familiar with MS Access. This tutorial will guide you through some of the basic point-and-click stuff, and will even show you how to issue complex SQL (Structured Query Language) queries. You will open the North wind Microsoft sample database and query it in various ways. This is a HANDS ON tutorial; it gives you step-by-step directions for carrying out simple tasks in Access. As you read, you should have a copy of the Northwind database open in Microsoft Access 2003, and you should carry out the tasks yourself, exactly as directed.

First, a few words about what Microsoft Access 2003 is and isn't. People who don't really understand what a relational database system is, and some people who don't actually understand what Access 2003 is, will tell you that Microsoft Access is not a fully relational database system. In the database world, not being fully relational is very bad. Don't worry, the people who tell you that are like the people who try to tell you that linux is not a 32 bit operating system. Access 2003, and its predecessors Access 95, 97 and 02, are excellent fully relational database systems.

Functional Programming in Haskell

As software becomes more and more complex, it is more and more important to structure it well. Well structured software is easy to write, easy to debug, and provides a collection of modules that can be reused to reduce future programming costs. Conventional languages place conceptual limits on the way problems can be modularized. Functional languages push those limits back. Writing large software systems that work is difficult and expensive. Maintaining those systems is even more difficult and expensive. Functional programming languages, such as Haskell, can make it easier and cheaper.

Haskell is an advanced purely functional programming language. The product of more than twenty years of cutting edge research, it allows rapid development of robust, concise, correct software. With strong support for integration with other languages, builtin concurrency and parallelism, debuggers, profilers, rich libraries and an active community, Haskell makes it easier to produce flexible, maintainable highquality software.

Functional Programming In Haskell

As software becomes more and more complex, it is more and more important to structure it well. Well structured software is easy to write, easy to debug, and provides a collection of modules that can be reused to reduce future programming costs. Conventional languages place conceptual limits on the way problems can be modularized. Functional languages push those limits back. Writing large software systems that work is difficult and expensive. Maintaining those systems is even more difficult and expensive. Functional programming languages, such as Haskell, can make it easier and cheaper.

Haskell is an advanced purely functional programming language. The product of more than twenty years of cutting edge research, it allows rapid development ofrobust, concise, correct software. With strong support for integration with other languages, builtin concurrency and parallelism, debuggers, profilers, rich libraries and an active community, Haskell makes it easier to produce flexible, maintainable highquality software.

Diet User’s Manual

Resource management is one of the key issues for the development of efficient Grid environments. Several approaches co-exist in today’s middleware platforms. The granularity of computation (or communication) and dependencies between computations can have a great influence on the software choices.

The first approach provides the user with a uniform view of resources. This is the case of GLOBUS which provides transparent MPI communications (with MPICH-G2) between distant nodes but does not manage load balancing issues between these nodes. It’s the user’s task to develop a code that will take into account the heterogeneity of the target architecture. Grid extensions to classical batch processing provide an alternative approach with projects like Condor-G or Sun GridEngine. Finally, peer-to-peer or Global computing can be used for fine grain and loosely coupled applications.

Principles of Fairness Quantification in Queueing Systems

Queues serve as a major scheduling device in computer networks, both at the network level and at the application level. A fundamental and important property of a queue service discipline is its fairness. Recent empirical studies show fairness in queues to be highly important to queueing customers in practical scenarios. The objective of this tutorial is to discuss the issue of queue fairness and its dilemmas, and to review the research conducted on this subject. We discuss the fundamental principles related to queue fairness in the perspective of the relevant applications, with some emphasis on computer communications networks. This is conducted in the context of the recent research in this area and the queueing related fairness measures which have been proposed in recent years. We describe, discuss and compare their properties, and evaluate their relevance to the various practical applications.

Queues serve as a major building block in computer networks and are used to schedule and prioritize tasks both at the network level and at the application level. With the advances of the Internet more and more services move from the “physical world” into the “network controlled” world and require the use of computer and communications controlled queues. Examples include file servers used for the download of music, video, games and other applications, and call-centers.

Tutorial on Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization

Multiple, often conflicting objectives arise naturally in most real-world optimization scenarios. As evolutionary algorithms possess several characteristics that are desirable for this type of problem, this class of search strategies has been used for multiobjective optimization for more than a decade. Meanwhile evolutionary multiobjective optimization has become established as a separate subdiscipline combining the fields of evolutionary computation and classical multiple criteria decision making.

This paper gives an overview of evolutionary multiobjective optimization with the focus on methods and theory. On the one hand, basic principles of multiobjective optimization and evolutionary algorithms are presented, and various algorithmic concepts such as fitness assignment, diversity preservation, and elitism are discussed. On the other hand, the tutorial includes some recent theoretical results on the performance of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms and addresses the question of how to simplify the exchange of methods and applications by means of a standardized interface.

Cloud Computing: A Taxonomy of Platform and Infrastructure-level Offerings

Cloud computing is a buzzword and umbrella term applied to several nascent trends in the turbulent landscape of information technology. Computing in the “cloud” alludes to ubiquitous and inexhaustible on-demand IT resources accessible through the Internet. Practically every new Internet-based service from Gmail to Amazon Web Services to Microsoft Online Services to even Facebook have been labeled “cloud” offerings, either officially or externally.

Although cloud computing has garnered significant interest, factors such as unclear terminology, non-existent product “paper launches”, and opportunistic marketing have led to a significant lack of clarity surrounding discussions of cloud computing technology and products. The need for clarity is well-recognized within the industry and by industry observers. Perhaps more importantly, due to the relative infancy of the industry, currently-available product offerings are not standardized. Neither providers nor potential consumers really know what a “good” cloud computing product offering should look like and what classes of products are appropriate. Consequently, products are not easily comparable.

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