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Safari CSS Reference

All Safari web browsers use the WebKit engine to display webpages. WebKit is an open source framework in Mac OS X that lets developers embed web browser functionality into applications. In providing this browser functionality, WebKit implements a number of extensions to HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This document covers support of cascading style sheets (CSS) in WebKit.

You can use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) in conjunction with HTML-based web content to fine-tune the style of the content. The goal of CSS is to separate the structure provided by HTML from the style provided by CSS. Taking style information out of the structure allows designers to independently tune a page’s style for a variety of audiences and readers (such as desktops, hand-held devices like iPhone, and text-based browsers).

CSS Cookbook

From the most obvious design elements, such as the font and leading used in paragraphs and headings, to those that are often overlooked, such as the size of the margins, every element you place in the layout of a web page adds to the intended message of the content being displayed.

This chapter covers the page elements that comprise a web page. Page elements are items that affect the appearance of a web page, but aren’t necessarily a part of the page. For example, a border around the viewport, the area of a web page that is seen by the user in the web browser, is a page element.

Hacking for Dummies

The author is not responsible for any abuse of this information. It is intended for educational use only. You may be quite shocked at how vulnerable you are! As an afterthought I added a section on database access due to a number of requests.

The majority of successful attacks on computer systems via the Internet can be traced to exploitation of security flaws in software and operating systems. These few software vulnerabilities account for the majority of successful attacks, simply because attackers are opportunistic – taking the easiest and most convenient route. They exploit the best-known flaws with the most effective and widely available attack tools. Most software, including operating systems and applications, comes with installation scripts or installation programs. The goal of these installation programs is to get the systems installed as quickly as possible, with the most useful functions enabled, with the least amount of work being performed by the administrator. To accomplish this goal, the scripts typically install more components than most users need. The vendor philosophy is that it is better to enable functions that are not needed, than to make the user install additional functions when they are needed. This approach, although convenient for the user, creates many of the most dangerous security vulnerabilities because users do not actively maintain and patch software components they don’t use. Furthermore, many users fail to realize what is actually installed, leaving dangerous samples on a system simply because users do not know they are there. Those unpatched services provide paths for attackers to take over computers.

Professional Programmer’s Guide to Fortran77

Fortran is the most widely used programming language in the world for numerical applications. It has achieved this position partly by being on the scene earlier than any of the other major languages and partly because it seems gradually to have evolved the features which its users, especially scientists and engineers, found most useful. In order to retain compatibility with old programs, Fortran has advanced mainly by adding new features rather than by removing old ones. The net result is, of course, that some parts of the language are, by present standards, rather archaic: some of these can be avoided easily, others can still be a nuisance. This section gives a brief history of the language, outlines its future prospects, and summarises its strengths and weaknesses.

In the interests of simplicity, the problems which these solve are hardly beyond the range of a good pocket calculator, and the programs shown here do not include various refinements that would usually be present in professional software. They are, however, complete working programs which you can try out for yourself if you have access to a Fortran system. If not, it is still worth reading through them to see how the basic elements of Fortran can be put together into complete programs.

Natural Language Processing: A Human–Computer Interaction Perspective

Natural language processing has been in existence for more than fifty years. During this time, it has significantly contributed to the field of human- computer interaction in terms of theoretical results and practical applications. As computers continue to become more affordable and accessible, the importance of user interfaces that are effective, robust, unobtrusive, and user-friendly – regardless of user expertise or impediments – becomes more pronounced. Since natural language usually provides for effortless and effective communication in human-human interaction, its significance and potential in human-computer interaction should not be overlooked – either spoken or typewritten, it may effectively complement other available modalities,1 such as windows, icons, and menus, and pointing; in some cases, such as in users with disabilities, natural language may even be the only applicable modality.

This chapter examines the field of natural language processing as it relates to human-computer interaction by focusing on its history, interactive application areas, theoretical approaches to linguistic modeling, and relevant computational and philosophical issues. It also presents a taxonomy for interactive natural language systems based on their linguistic knowledge and processing requirements, and reviews related applications. Finally, it discusses linguistic coverage issues, and explores the develop development of natural language widgets and their integration into multimodal user interfaces.

Adobe Indesign Cs4 Scripting Tutorial

Scripting is the most powerful feature in Adobe® InDesign® CS4. No other feature can save you as much time, trouble, and money as scripting. This document is for every InDesign user. If you never created a script before, we show you how to get started. If you wrote scripts for other applications, we show you how to apply your knowledge to InDesign scripting.

The document also covers how to install and run an InDesign script and describes what InDesign scripting can and cannot do. We discuss the software you need to start writing your own scripts. After you learn the basics of InDesign scripting in this tutorial, you can move on to Adobe InDesign CS4 Scripting Guide, which explores scripting in more depth. Adobe InDesign CS4 Scripting Guide contains hundreds of tutorial scripts covering topics like text formatting, finding and changing text, associating scripts with menu items, drawing objects on a page, and exporting documents.

Adobe InDesign CS3 Scripting Tutorial

Scripting is the most powerful feature in Adobe? InDesign? CS3. No other feature can save you as much time, trouble, and money as scripting. This document is for every InDesign user. If you never created a script before, we show you how to get started. If you wrote scripts for other applications, we show you how to apply your knowledge to InDesign scripting.

The document also covers how to install and run an InDesign script and describes what InDesign scripting can and cannot do. We discuss the software you need to start writing your own scripts. After you learn the basics of InDesign scripting in this tutorial, you can move on to Adobe InDesign CS3 Scripting Guide, which explores scripting in more depth.

Visual Programming Languages: A Survey

From cave paintings to hieroglyphics to paintings of Campbell’s soup cans, humans have long communicated with each other using images. The field of visual programming languages asks: why, then, do we persist in trying to communicate with our computers using textual programming languages? Would we not be more productive and would the power of modern computers not be accessible to a wider range of people if we were able to instruct a computer by simply drawing for it the images we see in our mind’s eye when we consider the solutions to particular problems? Obviously, proponents of visual programming languages (VPLs) argue that the answer to both these questions is yes.

The questions above highlight the primary motivations for most research into VPLs. First, many people think and remember things in terms of pictures. They relate to the world in an inherently graphical way and use imagery as a primary component of creative thought [Smith 1975]. In addition, textual programming languages have proven to be rather difficult for many creative and intelligent people to learn to use effectively. Reducing or removing entirely the necessity of translating visual ideas into somewhat artificial textual representations can help to mitigate this steep learning curve problem. Furthermore, a variety of applications, including scientific visualization and interactive simulation authoring, lend themselves particularly well to visual development methods.

A Programming Language Where the Syntax and Semantics Are Mutable at Runtime

Katahdin is a programming language where the syntax and semantics are mutable at runtime. The Katahdin interpreter parses and executes programs according to a language definition that can be modified by the running program. Commands to modify the language definition are similar to those that define new types and functions in other languages, and can be collected into language definition modules.

Katahdin can execute programs written in any language which it has a definition module for. The definition of more than one language can be composed allowing more than one language to be used in the same program, the same file, and even the same function. Data and code is shared between all languages, with a function defined in one language callable from another with no binding layer. Traditional language development involves using a parser generator tool to generate a static parser from the language grammar. Katahdin’s approach is to just-in-time compile a parser from the grammar as the program runs. The grammar can be modified as the program runs because the parser can be recompiled to match it.

Objective-C2.0 Runtime Programming Guide

The Objective-C language defers as many decisions as it can from compile time and link time to runtime. Whenever possible, it does things dynamically. This means that the language requires not just a compiler, but also a runtime system to execute the compiled code. The runtime system acts as a kind of operating system for the Objective-C language; it’s what makes the language work.

This document looks at the NSObject class and how Objective-C programs interact with the runtime system. In particular, it examines the paradigms for dynamically loading new classes at runtime, and forwarding messages to other objects. It also provides information about how you can find information about objects while your program is running.

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